Petrushka

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Petrushka

Postby CvdC » 04 Mar 2014, 08:53

http://youtu.be/EurOvUtzUJo

Watching a puppet show in another language allows you to watch the puppetry without the distraction of words.
Although there is a lot in this as the puppeteer is a part of the show. The puppets have a nice crispness to their movements I thought.
It has been my experience that I am always true from my point of view, and am often wrong from the point of view of my honest critics. I know that we are both right from our respective points of view. - Gandhi (Having a bob each way.)
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Re: Petrushka

Postby CvdC » 05 Mar 2014, 01:38

What I like about this performance:
I think it is interesting how the performer has put the flap, or whatever, in front of the booth so he can interact with the puppet and audience. It sort of reminds me of Bryan Clarke's impromptu appearances within the booth. The puppet seems to have a life of its own even while the performer is visible, which is of course something we expect in a ventriloquist show and so it adds another dimension to this particular performance.

I like the way he moves the puppet when it speaks. He uses sharp quick moves that are both manic and expressive, emphasising each line precisely - "twitchy" may be a good word.

I like the movement of the hat. This emphasises the previous point.

All movements are exaggerated. A bow is a large sweeping movement that in some cases will include very rapid shaking.

The stick action is similar to the Italian shows, with this show sitting somewhere between those and a Punch show from the UK.

The Petrushka puppet does stay very still when not speaking. But somehow this seems to compliment the rhythm of the show. The arms are still kept in position so I don't think this stillness is the result of a lazy performance, which would make the puppet look lifeless.

I like the way the policeman when knocked down hangs out over the edge of the booth. In puppet shows it seems to be always good to see puppets breaking the boundaries. It is good when the puppet is hit and it springs up and down, the puppet being over the edge means it is seen from the side and so the blows are emphasised and very visual, which makes them less violent and more comic.

Turns are crisp. Nice sudden stops and quick moves. No meaningless moves which can blur the show. It is like semaphore, with puppets instead of flags.

I have been looking at the criteria by which the PJF assess for full membership. One of the criteria talks about pace and attack and I was wondering what that meant and how it would be evaluated. The above, I think, may be aspects one could look for.

Given you can still watch this video without knowing any Russian and know what is going on , it goes to show that a lively show may be more important than an intelligible swazzle and lots of chatter between the puppets. Of course there is a lot of chatter in this video, but it isn't essential.
It has been my experience that I am always true from my point of view, and am often wrong from the point of view of my honest critics. I know that we are both right from our respective points of view. - Gandhi (Having a bob each way.)
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