Stiffening for arms

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Re: Stiffening for arms

Postby martinpunch » 20 Apr 2015, 18:59

Kindest regards

Martin

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Re: Stiffening for arms

Postby Chris » 20 Apr 2015, 20:28

Well it's easy to find it cheaper than that
http://efabrics.co.uk/CLEARANCE-Glazed-Cotton-60-wide-SAVE-40

But isn't this all getting a bit anal? You really don't need to be buying special fabrics - go to a remnant shop or market stall and look at cheap curtainings or shirtings. Buy whatever is cheap or on offer. Just avoid anything that is going to cling, crepe or stretch fabrics, or anything too stiff that will spoil the draping of the actual garment.

If you haven't a remnant outlet near you you could tryhttp://www.abakhan.co.uk
But really it is better to physically see and feel fabrics before buying.
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Re: Stiffening for arms

Postby martinpunch » 20 Apr 2015, 21:13

I am not sure if it is getting anal, I just want to not impede my practice when they are finished. I have 5 yards of the shined stuff as I thought it would be good for the lining and good practice of sewing machine skills. But I don't think I can use it. Initially it is very good, but after a while it gets clingy, good for characters that her fleeting appearances on stage, but not good for more than a few minutes. So I don't want to get it wrong again and need fabric fast. I will give the local shop a call but £2.49 is good for a metre especially if it come recommended
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Re: Stiffening for arms

Postby CvdC » 21 Apr 2015, 05:38

I would be interested in how throwing this quotation back into the conversation in any way bolsters your point of view?
"If I were a perfectionist I would sew canvas into the whole costume to give it shape and strength."
I happen to think this would be a good way to give the costume more form and ability to cope with wear and tear and cannot see how it would make it stiff and impede the performance of the puppet. the only reason I don't do it is that it requires an enormous effort.


I was at the fabric shop this afternoon and happened to look at the fabric marked as being "Poplin" and it does not at all look or feel like your description of it. I would suggest you look in your wardrobe and read the labels on your old shirts. These constant snide little quibbles have made it very difficult for anyone (not just me) to contribute to this message board.
It has been my experience that I am always true from my point of view, and am often wrong from the point of view of my honest critics. I know that we are both right from our respective points of view. - Gandhi (Having a bob each way.)
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Re: Stiffening for arms

Postby Chris » 21 Apr 2015, 08:07

Poplin, also called tabinet (or tabbinet), is a strong fabric in a plain weave of any fiber or blend, with crosswise ribs that typically gives a corded surface.[1]

Poplin traditionally consisted of a silk warp with a weft of worsted yarn. As the weft is in the form of a stout cord the fabric has a ridged structure, like rep, which gave depth and softness to the lustre of the silky surface. It is now made with wool, cotton, silk, rayon, or any mixture of these. The ribs run across the fabric from selvage to selvage.

Poplins are used for dress purposes, and for rich upholstery work. They are formed by using coarse filling yarns in a plain weave. Shirts made from this material are easy to iron and do not wrinkle easily.

Wikepedia

If you really "can't see how" sewing "canvas into the whole costume"" would make it stiff and impede performance of the puppet" then our worlds of experience are just too far apart.
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Re: Stiffening for arms

Postby martinpunch » 21 Apr 2015, 19:30

I have tried out an idea of stiffening the arms and the central third of the front of the skeleton (this has an extending neck) so that it is easier to rotate and extend the neck. It seems to work ok and the movement of my hand rotating the neck is hidden quite well by the stiffening.

The whole body sorta supports its self, there are a couple of minor adjustments I want to make with the shape of the stiffening but borrowing CHris's idea seems quite good for this puppet
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Re: Stiffening for arms

Postby johnstoate » 28 Apr 2015, 13:04

Err, Whilst on the subject of fabrics for dolls, Don't forget MY favoured supply point. Which is, of course, the curse of the modern townscape i.e. The charity shop!! - You can find all manner of material & pattern, old curtains for larger pieces, and even in many of them fents,( Odd bits of end-of-roll etc.)
They are also great for bits of costume jewellery, buttons and the like, and best of all......They're Cheap!!!! :lol:
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Re: Stiffening for arms

Postby martinpunch » 28 Apr 2015, 23:09

I have been living in charity shops the last few weeks and whilst some are really good ones, mainly the animal loving ones mostly, the rest have gone all boutiquey and want £8 for most items which basically is untenable to pay for bits of puppets. Car boots are my latest faze. The charity shop "rag" every thing interesting and put out lines of clothes the same style or colour, gone are the jumble sale style piles of clothes. I am struggling to find fabrics for my main two characters
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Re: Stiffening for arms

Postby Chris » 28 Apr 2015, 23:59

Charity shops and car boots are great fun for finding the unexpected, but I hardly think they are best for finding fabrics for puppets. You are not looking for garments. The best place for fabrics is a fabric shop. Here you have a chance of finding a selection from which to choose, a nice new, flat piece which you won't have to be unpicking and working from odd shapes. And probably you won't pay much more for a half metre of just right thing than you paid for the garment which isn't quite the right colour which you have to pull to pieces before you find there isn't quite enough.
Cast off garments do have a part to play, but why on earth buy them when you can get them for free from your own home or a neighbours. Rescue stuff from the re-cycling bag, or what about that old shirt before your wife cuts it up for dusters. There must be a mass of clothing thrown away by all of us, judging by the number of charity bags which come through the letter box, or the number of Oxfam and Salvation Army ReCycling bins that abound. So let your wife and neighbours know what you are after and see what turns up for free before it gets anywhere near a charity shop.
I've got boxes of costume jewellery, braids, buttons etc. all which have been given to me by friends who, while clearing out, thought these might be useful for the puppets. Just let people know of your little peculiarities and it will pay dividends.
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Re: Stiffening for arms

Postby johnstoate » 29 Apr 2015, 01:13

And you wonder why this otherwise excellent site is so quiet???--- A post, intended to be of assistance, gets the usual Somerville response. With all due respect Chris, Not everyone has your access to dress materials and costume jewellery, and as a result may appreciate the 'charity shop' idea. Certainly, some of them are overly expensive, but only because the people that frequent them pay the 'asked' price without question, - they get the stuff for nothing, and therefore will always deal. WE USED TO HAVE GOOD DISCUSSION AND MISCHIEF ON HERE, YOU HAVE OFTEN SAID HOW MUCH IT COSTS YOU IN BANDWIDTH ETC. TO RUN THIS SITE, DO YOU REALLY WANT IT TO FADE AWAY ???????- 'Cos it will if you continue to 'vitriol' the majority of posts. You will destroy the very thing you set out to create. And I have to say that, Would be a tragic thing !
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Re: Stiffening for arms

Postby lesclarke » 29 Apr 2015, 08:18

What! Throw away my old clothes! Old clothes are for wearing, and new clothes are for 'saving for best' ie not wearing.

And it can be dangerous, I wore new clothes last year and the dog didn't recognise me.
As if I haven't got enough to do today, with all I've got to do today.
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Re: Stiffening for arms

Postby Chris » 29 Apr 2015, 11:45

My reply wasn't to you John, it was to Martin. I think you should re-read it. There isn't any vitriol in it whatsoever. Nor was there any suggestion that I had particular access to fabric or costume jewellery. I was pointing out that in the light of Martin's observation that most charity shops now price their clothing as desireable garments it was better to not use the charity shops but to either buy the fabric itself, or better still get the old clothes for free before they reached the charity shops. That is by asking your friends etc. That is a very practical suggestion which I know produces results and how anyone can read vitriol in it I can't imagine. I expect you to suspend your paranoia long enough to re-read my posting, and then apologise.
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Re: Stiffening for arms

Postby martinpunch » 29 Apr 2015, 20:24

I am using fabric shops for the main part, but what I really want is primary colours and interesting fabrics, even the fabric shops seem to follow fashion and stock pastel coloured fabrics by the mile. I am very Inexperienced in seeing what is in front of me when it comes to fabrics, so finished garments help me to picture how the frilly bits will work. Basically I am a bit out om my depth with it all, but I am a tryer.

On all forums there are always issues how people come across in the written form, I think it is because we are all lazy typist, so I tend to have a thick skin, as most people are helping even if advice comes across a bit robust at times.

I will post some more pics of progress soon and don my tortoise shell for te feedback :)
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Re: Stiffening for arms

Postby Chris » 29 Apr 2015, 23:06

If you want to get some ideas about how coloured fabrics work together, and how to add attractive trimming and detail, then have a wander around an Asda store - in the George Department (that being their fashin trade name). The place to look is where they display the range of children's clothing - beautifully designed in bold colours with very attractive use of contrasting coloured pockets, big colourful buttons etc.I'm not suggesting you buy anything, children's clothes are expensive but the designs are very inspiring. And if you have a camera on your mobile phone then you can snap a few pictures for reference.
I mention Asda because their kids clothes range is particularly good - but I'm sure that the same applies to other supermarkets and department stores.
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