Beach Booths

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Beach Booths

Postby Nick Jackson » 12 Aug 2007, 09:28

Just wondering what sort of booths people use on sand.

My promenade show is a heavy, solid structure which is bolted together at the beginning of the season and wheeled out each day on a trolley. For next season I need something which will work on sand and will also fit in the car – hoping to be at several venues.

I think we would all agree that, while we want durability, we don't like spending an hour constructing something which takes several trips from the car.

The two portable booths I have are OK if I'm sheltered on one side and can tie back to railings, or peg down to grass. But beaches are not exactly sheltered places and one sudden gust of wind can do a lot of damage.

Thoughts and suggestions welcomed.
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Postby Chris » 12 Aug 2007, 10:50

I would have thought that a good tent peg correctly placed would hold securely in sand. I use a standard lazy tongs type booth on Llanfairfechan seafront. This is on a strip of grass parallel with the beach and it is perpetually very very windy. The booth remains secure with four guy ropes at the diagonal points. The head wind is so strong that the tilt noticeably saucers and the backcloth moulds to shape of my face - but the booth stays secure. I have found that if you facing or backing on to the wind is OK - it is when the wind is coming at an angle that twisting of the framework can occur and this can cause breakage.






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Postby Peter » 12 Aug 2007, 11:33

Nick, the booth I've been using on the beach for years is pictured below in 2 stages of construction. It folds flat for transporting.
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The frame is in 3 parts which fold in half (hinged). The back has a rigid bar across the top.
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The scenery also has fixed bars top and bottom which stops it blowing about in sea breezes and helps make the frame even more rigid.
We use stakes in the 4 corners inside and tie to them, also ropes with bunting on outside to deal with seaside weather.
The cover is sail cloth.
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Postby Nick Jackson » 12 Aug 2007, 13:20

Thanks for that, Chris and Peter. I willl try to convert my plans to a pdf so I can post them on here.
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Postby johnstoate » 12 Aug 2007, 20:19

On the subject of anchorage Nick, I would suggest a trip to your local scrapyard, or railway yard. I have some excellent ground anchors, - They are ex-railway 'chairs' used to hold the rails on concrete sleepers, very heavy, (18k) but still quite portable, they have the advantage of holes in each end, which can be used for the big steel tentpegs if required, and on sand you could always part bury them! - I got a couple for Eek recently, could probably get some more, only problem is transporting them over to you!! - They aren't exactly postage freindly :lol:
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Postby Nick Jackson » 12 Aug 2007, 20:26

I have some lead weight from an old dumb waiter – quite useful on hard standing.
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Postby Tony James » 12 Aug 2007, 21:50

I have no experience of working on natural beaches. But I have worked artificial beaches, constructed inland for seaside events. I was on one only two weeks ago. Big and deep.

The problem I always find is the extent to which the frame sinks into the sand. I work on a portable floor and that sinks too. Granted, they eventually find their own level but certainly near;y three inches is common.

And as for pegging, there's not a lot of grip with short pegs - 6 to 8 inches. They pull out so easily.

What do people use on sand when working a conventional frame?
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Postby Chris » 12 Aug 2007, 21:53

Since you say that you don't want several trips too and from the car I would suggest that anything heavy is not favourite. I'm sure that with four long stakes tied to each leg, and a pegged guy rope to each top corner, you will be pretty secure.



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Postby johnstoate » 13 Aug 2007, 12:57

Me again, Another way of getting a secure anchor in sand is the old army trick,- You use folding entrenching tools. (The little folding spades you get in surplus & camping shops) - dig the blade in at an angle away from the booth, handle folded towards it, and tie off to the handle. This gives you a broad surface to the sand to pull against, and doesn't take up much room for traveling-It works!
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Postby Nick Jackson » 13 Aug 2007, 14:19

Trying to picture one of these – sound fascinating.
What are they called? Will then Google them!
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Postby johnstoate » 13 Aug 2007, 14:37

Hello Nick, save you the trouble, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/shovel -The type you want is there as usmc. type folding, with the 'D' handle, they are great to tie back to.
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Postby Nick Jackson » 13 Aug 2007, 16:20

Fascinating.
And the great thing is, you can dig a sandcastle after the show!
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Folding bucket, anyone?
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Postby Professor Eek » 13 Aug 2007, 18:01

I am delighted with my railway thingy's that John Stoate got for me.

Manageable to carry as shape is user friendly yet heavy enough for all but strong wind I suspect
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Postby johnstoate » 13 Aug 2007, 19:10

OOH! - mercy buckets, monsewer Eek, - always glad to be of service, The cheque for the ad's in the post!! :lol:
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Postby Chris » 13 Aug 2007, 22:15

Of course you could always tie off to the Tank Nick, I understand Shermans to be pretty substantial, or perhaps an army surplus gun carriage might be useful? It should be no more difficult to tow than a small caravan - and would not block visibility in your rear view mirror.


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