Medieval puppets

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Medieval puppets

Postby CvdC » 09 May 2013, 12:38

Would anyone be interested in commissioning a set of medieval puppets? I want to make a set but need someone to order them as impetus.
These would be a Punch puppet as a jester, Judy dressed in the costume of the time, baby as usual, instead of a constable I'd make a soldier with knitted material that looked like chain mail, Joey would be a peasant, the doctor would be a monk similar to the Piccini blind man I already make, the devil I'd make based on an illustration from the time and the crocodile would be a dragon.
If puppets such as these were performed in a booth with turrets either side and a rainbow across the top it would be perfect for all those medieval fayres they have near castles. Such a business opportunity!

Contact me from this web site. The prices would be the same as for the normal Punch and Judy puppets.

http://www.speckinspace.com/whatsit/puppets.html
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Re: Medieval puppets

Postby CvdC » 11 May 2013, 02:25

[Enter Joseph, an insolent peasant]
Joseph: Hark! Master Punch,Dost thou disireth a repast to sate thy hunger most demanding?
Punch: Peasant, indeed I dost.
Joseph: Then sire I shalt go forthwith and fetch unto you a string of fine sausages made this very morn by your worthy cook.
Punch: Forsooth I my hunger is great. Do not tarry.
[Joseph exits and renters with a long string of sausages.]
Joseph: Behold a string of the finest porcine charcuterie. My lord I shalt leave you with this string whilst I return to yonder kitchens for I hast forgotten that which we canst cook them, namely the frying pan. But whilst I venture forth my Lord be wary as there be Dragons in this region and these beasts are fond of this food.
Punch: Go forth fine fellow and fear not as I have greater love of the possibility of this meal than fear of such fantastical beasts.
[Exaunt Joseph to fetch the frying pan.]
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Re: Medieval puppets

Postby Trevek » 11 May 2013, 12:44

I have a publication by George Speaight, somewhere, which he suggested was the earliest known example of puppet script in English.

Ah, found a reference


An even earlier evidence of puppet plays is also from England. George Speaight has discovered an article in the Records of Early English Drama, issue 1979:2, wherein Ian Lancashire has connected a 1431 English puppet play Joly Walte and Malkyng to the oldest English play-text Interludium de Clerico at Puella (The Interlude of the Cleric and the Girl), dated c. 1300 AD. Speaight goes further and thinks it a possibility that the 1300 fragment is also a puppet play text! (See his The Earliest English Puppet Play?, 1997, published by Ray DaSilva Puppet Books.) His reasons for thinking this are that the play (in its surviving fragmentary form), has only two characters appearing on the stage at a time - this is a necessary convention of traveling glove-puppet shows, where the single puppeteer slips a puppet on each hand, allowing only two characters on stage for each scene – plus, the fact that “Malkin” (the name of the “Girl” character in this play) had, among other meanings, also the sense of “puppet,” according to old English dictionaries.


from this paper: http://pages.citenet.net/users/ctmw2400 ... tions.html
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Re: Medieval puppets

Postby CvdC » 11 May 2013, 22:28

"The Interlude of the Cleric and the Girl"?
Was that perchance a precursor to the "Bishop and the Actress"? A well known puppet play.
It is Sunday morning here and I wake up regretting I am not now in London.
Oh well I shall continue my play writing.

Punch: judy! Come my fair wife
[Judy enters]
Judy: What dost thou want?
Punch: Prithee a kiss my dearest. A sweet peck upon thine lips.
Judy [repelling his advances] Nay thou canst not. Pray Mister Punchinello didst thy not sup with me last night?
Punch: Aye my sweetest
Judy: And didst thou not partake freely of thy masters wine?
Punch: Aye and indeed it was a pleasure oft repeated.
Judy: Then pray good Sire hast thou not a head as painful as that of thy good wife? Dost thou desire not exceed thou capability?
Punch: Just a peck my sweetest concubine. Allow me to steal one upon thy cheek.
[Kisses judy who in return hits him on the head]
Judy: Forsooth you old fool! Enough of your affectionate pecks for we still have that which came about when last we indulged ourselves so foolishly.
Punch: Pray tell what be that?
[judy exits and returns with the baby]

And so it goes. The question being, was the above written by the Bard of Stratford or by Christopher Marlowe?
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Re: Medieval puppets

Postby Trevek » 30 May 2013, 21:22

Found it... here's the book in question... has the same picture too.
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Re: Medieval puppets

Postby Christopher Foxe » 15 Jun 2013, 03:30

Thanks, Treveck.

But at US$55.00 (+ p&p) for a 16 page 2nd hand edition, think I'll will stick with the original (and translation) provided here, even if it does not provide a conclusion.

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Re: Medieval puppets

Postby Trevek » 15 Jun 2013, 08:37

Thanks Christopher.

Wow, I always thought US had cheap books!

Nice to see the original... it proves mobile phones existed then... cos it seems to be written in text-speak.

The conclusion for it being a puppet show centres much around there being only 2 characters on stage at a time.
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Re: Medieval puppets

Postby Christopher Foxe » 16 Jun 2013, 08:34

Actually, found a substantially cheaper version on Amazon.uk (worked out to NZ$34.00 including p&p).

Nice to see the original... it proves mobile phones existed then... cos it seems to be written in text-speak.


LoL! At least it's only 88 lines ... try reading "Piers the Ploughman" or Chaucer's "Canterbury Tales" in the original Middle English ;)

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Re: Medieval puppets

Postby Trevek » 23 Jun 2013, 11:45

Ah, yes, Christopher.

Never tried Piers, but certainly got about halfway through the Tales. Even devised a monologue of The Miller's Tale, "coupled" with a version of the Reeve's as a theatre piece (albeit in Modern English).

T:-)
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Re: Medieval puppets

Postby Harvey » 12 Jul 2013, 09:08

are they like this
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The Young Professor http://www.professor-harvo.xbuild.com at the age of 18
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